Ergonomics problems lead to the invention for fishermen

Invercargill man Brian Smith with his patented invention, the Rodassista, to help people use their fishing rods.

Robyn Edie / Stuff

Invercargill man Brian Smith with his patented invention, the Rodassista, to help people use their fishing rods.

A Southland fisherman has created a device that he says will help with fishing ergonomics.

In 2010, Brian Smith noticed that he and others were having issues with their arms, backs, and legs because the tips of their fishing rods weren’t standing still.

Smith decided to search the market for a solution but couldn’t find anything, so he took it upon himself to create something.

He invented a strap device that would hold the end of the fishing rod stationary, thus stopping the pressures on the arms and back from the constant movement.

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His Rodassista was in his cupboard collecting dust until 2016, when Smith suffered a heart attack.

“Due to professional commitments, I put it aside. When I got sick I took it out again because I had a lot of free time, ”he said.

Smith has had two hip replacements and a stroke since his heart attack, so he devoted himself to his invention.

He teamed up with plastic engineer Graeme Rickard and created Innovative Fishing Equipment, the Rodassista being their flagship item but also offering other equipment for fishermen.

The company spent four months researching if something like the Rodassista existed in the world and found nothing like it and was therefore able to patent it internationally, Smith said.

Invercargill man Brian Smith with his patented invention, the Rodassista, to help people use their fishing rods.

Robyn Edie / Stuff

Invercargill man Brian Smith with his patented invention, the Rodassista, to help people use their fishing rods.

According to Smith, 80% of the sticks will be suitable for the invention, and they also have a chiropractor reviewing them.

“I’m really proud of what we’ve done. I know people who are now going to go fishing and try this, and they haven’t been able to fish for years because of the pain, but they want to come for a ride, ”he said.

The company plans to sell online as a first step and attend numerous trade shows, such as the Southland Boat Show, to demonstrate how the product works before moving on to retail and wholesale.

Smith intends to market his product worldwide and is expected to launch the product in the markets in August.

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